Posts tagged ‘eco-education’

Chipper Activity + Craft: Nature Walk and Craft Project


Explore the outdoors with your little one(s) and collect nature materials to make cute critters! Not only will you a foster a connection with nature, your kids can also exercise their imaginations and creativity. There is so much you can find outside: nuts, rocks, sticks, leaves, petals, and more. 

Nature Animals | Let's Go Chipper

Picture from naturallymom

Chipper Playfully Teaches: Earth and Space Science, Creative Arts and Fine Motor Skills.

Adventure into the great outdoors with young children and use the natural materials as craft supplies for creating creatures from the children’s imagination or animals identified on the walks.

Collect with a Partner | Let's Go Chipper

Collect with a Partner

Timing: One Hour
Explore and collect: 15 minutes
Craft Time: 30 minutes
Extra 15 minutes:
 Travel time and padding because projects with young children will always take longer than you plan!

What you need:

  • Reusable tote to carry found treasures
  • Cardboard bases from recycled boxes and scrap paper and materials for accessorizing crafts
  • Glue and string
  • A partner or chaperone
  • Imagination
Create a crocodile | Let's Go Chipper

Create a crocodile!

Chippers Tips:

  • Explain the rules of staying together “You can play, but don’t stray!” and the project
  • Check off that everyone has their tote for collecting items. While exploring, be it in the backyard of a school facility, house, childcare center, or beyond the yard, keep children on track by talking about what they might find; the colors, shapes, texture and more.
  • Assist young children with glue or glue gun and string assembly.
  • Welcome conversation while exploring. What do you see, hear, smell and feel?
Get bit by nature...creatively! | Let's Go Chipper

Get bit by nature…creatively!

Upon returning, sit down and talk about the items in the bag and what can be made; a butterfly from leaves, a nature cake, a boat from sticks, a car from rocks and bark. Welcome the conversation and encourage the creativity!

Chipper Activity + Craft: Nature Walk and Craft Project

Image from WildlifeFun4Kids

May 9, 2014 at 1:30 pm Leave a comment

Chipper Tip: Lessons in Condensation


Rainy season has arrived! Whether you are experiencing snow and rain in the North West or a sunny summer on the opposite hemisphere, condensation is a common occurrence that can turn into an educational lesson for your little one(s).

Learning about the water cycle and condensation | Let's Go Chipper | Eco-education for kids

In the car or at home, windows fog and water drops form. In the bathroom after a long shower, mirrors get fogged. Use these teachable moments to talk about the water cycle and it’s importance to our entire planet. Let your kids know about water conservation, especially during droughts, when bathing, brushing teeth, or washing dishes and clothes. As the saying goes, “Waste not, want not!” The more we save, the more have in the long run!

Water is important for our survival and also for the survival of plants and animals. During rainy season, explore the outdoors and search for little critters soaking in the rain like Chester the Wise Old Frog and Bruce the Banana Slug. Some animals and plants need more water than others. Humans, for example, should drink around 2-3 liters of water a day, where as giraffes get most of their moisture from leaves, so they can go months without drinking water!

Learning about the water cycle and condensation | Let's Go Chipper | Eco-education for kids

Teach your kiddos about the following terms so they become familiar with the water cycle! Try some of the activities to illustrate their meaning and give your child an opportunity to really understand this important ecological process.

1.  Evaporation is when the sun heats up water in rivers or lakes or the ocean and turns it into vapor or steam. The water vapor or steam leaves the river, lake or ocean and goes into the air, forming clouds.

Illustrate: Boil some water in a kettle so children can see the vapor rising!

Learning about the water cycle and condensation | Let's Go Chipper | Eco-education for kids

2. Condensation is when water vapor in the air gets cold and changes back into liquid, forming clouds. Clouds are made up of tiny water molecules.

Illustrate: Use a window, mirror or any glass surface and breath on it. Your warm breath forms a foggy layer that is like a thin cloud on your mirror! Use your fingers to draw a smiley face 🙂

3.  Precipitation occurs when so much water has condensed that the air cannot hold it anymore. The water molecules start to bounce and shake (precipitate), making the cloud so heavy that the water falls back to the earth in the form of rain drop or rainfall. The water can also fall hail, sleet or snow depending on how cold it is.

Illustrate: Pour a glass of cold water on a hot day and watch what happens. Or if it’s still cold out, place a cup of warm water on the counter. Then put some ice on to a plate and place on top of the cup. Water will start to form on the outside of the glass and drip down the sides. That water didn’t somehow leak through the glass! It actually came from the air. Water vapor in the warm air turns back into liquid when it touches the cold glass. This is precipitation in action!

Let's Go Chipper | Lessons in Condensation and learning about the water cycle | Eco-education for kids

4.  Collection: When water falls back to earth as precipitation, it may fall back in the oceans, lakes or rivers or it may end up on land.  When it ends up on land, it will either soak into the earth and become part of the “ground water” that plants and animals use to drink or it may run over the soil and collect in the oceans, lakes or rivers where the cycle starts!

Illustrate: After a rainy day or snow fall, go outside with your kids and try to find evidence of water collection: puddles form, street gutters flow, and plants soak in the rain! Take a little trip and visit your local water reservoir to see where your town’s drinking water comes from. The more they see and experience, the more your children will understand!

What other ways can you illustrate the water cycle? Share with Chipper! We love hearing about your outdoor adventures and educational stories!

February 26, 2014 at 2:22 pm Leave a comment

Chipper Tip: Teach Your Kids to Garden


Gardening with Kids | Let's Go ChipperWith new technologies constantly emerging, children are increasingly looking to screens to entertain themselves. However, according to Stephen Kellert, Tweedy/Ordway Professor Emeritus of Social Ecology and Senior Research Scholar at the Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, “there’s increasing evidence that suggests that even in the modern world, whether it’s attentional capacity or stress relief or critical thinking or problem solving or physical fitness, …the experience of nature helps facilitate these adaptations.”

The truth of the matter is that children need engagement with nature—nature provides a tangible look at the world around us that technology simply cannot offer. For example, a child may learn about the difference between a seagull and a robin in a textbook, or even an online article or software. However, being able to physically go to a zoo, and interact with and see both the seagull and robin can arguably teach that child more than just learning about said animals in a textual manner.

Kellert asserts that there is enormous complexity in nature. He states, “when you think about the variety and complexity of the everyday understanding, you realize how much adaptation and coping and classification and naming that goes on in response to this extraordinarily complex, complicated, diverse world that is beyond our self. You begin to realize how much opportunity there is for children to… name, to classify, to problem solve, to create, to think about how to…critically think and adaptive response to different elements of this dynamic, ambient, changing uncertain, surprising world that is the world of beyond just ourselves as a single species.” Clearly, there is mass importance in involving your child in nature. A very simple way is to teach your kids how to garden in the bounds of your own backyard!

Here are some simple steps to teaching your kids how to garden, courtesy of WikiHow:

  1. Focus on making it fun and interesting. If your kids actually are interested in the fascinating process of plant growth, animal interaction, etc., they’ll be more inclined to participate.
  2. Make sure you have the right tools. Having the right tools and equipment is not only essential but makes the gardening process more fun!
  3. Because your kids are beginning gardeners, choose plants that are easy to grow. Suggested plants include: Sunflowers, Radishes, Squash, Tomatoes (from seedlings), Lettuces, Peas and beans, Sweet peaspoppies,alyssum, marigoldspansies or nasturtiums.
  4. Show you children the basics of planting seed! Beforehand, till and add nutrients to the soil—they can learn about this process afterwards. For now, focus on just helping your children plant seeds!
  5. Along with teaching them how to garden, introduce the various types of wildlife that are involved with garden life. This will add an extra dimension to your children’s nature education.

Clearly, there are many benefits to exposing your child to nature; additionally, it’s super easy to introduce nature into their education! Let’s Go Chipper for nature and education!

 

July 10, 2013 at 2:00 pm Leave a comment


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