A Time to Give


I'm a Chipper Mom | Expert Advice for Moms and ParentsThe pressure to raise a high achieving, conscientious and contributing child can overshadow the benefits of giving back as an individual or family. When we help others, we are reminded of what we have and don’t have in life. It is an opportunity to teach our children what life is really about and how we can contribute for the betterment of our community and world. Helping excites emotions of empathy, joy, guilt, and often leaves us motivated to do more. But understanding these emotions and convictions isn’t intuitive.

So when is the right time to teach our kids about giving, and what are some of the steps we can take to connect them with opportunities to help in the community?

Research has shown that a child can start determining right from wrong by the age of 6 months, and by the age of 15 months, a child realizes for every action there is a reaction. A person drops something and the child – not yet walking – crawls over, picks it up, and gives it back. Now that we know there is reason to believe every child has the capability to grow up and give back, let’s take time to allow our kids to grow into the opportunities to contribute.

Connect with Young Children

Beyond the physical action of committing to a specific organization, each day you can find ways to excite the emotional, mindfulness of your children just by presenting positive experiences. By doing so you are exciting the intuitive mindset; understanding that a child will care for what they love, or feel a positive connection towards. Ask for help and empower their minds to think creatively about how they can solve a situation. Little helpers become creative thought leaders so guide the process and provide age-appropriate opportunities that work for your family.

For example, without joining an organization you can model helpful behavior for your kids under five just by picking up trash on the sidewalk as you make your way to the park; holding open the door for the next person as you walk into a store; or taking the shopping cart back for the person parked next to you at the grocery store. Children mirror what they see and these early interactions will allow them to experience a positive reaction, thankfulness.

Teach Kids Environmental Stewardship

Next time you are on a hike with your three year old talk to them about keeping the trails clean so the plants and animals will stay healthy. Bring an extra bag to pick up any trash and then talk about the best way to discard it. The walk is healthy and you are teaching your child about environmental stewardship in a joyful way.

For children under five years old the opportunity to give and contribute is within daily activities and experiences so identify activities that tap into interests as well. Like art!

Crafting with Kids

Next time you host the play-date or birthday party try infusing crafts into the celebration. Decorate cards then string them up and donate to your community nursing home or Veteran’s hospital. By the time your children reach the age of six or older bring them to the nursing home to deliver the gifts. Click here for some great recycle craft ideas!

Many elderly people are part of an Adopt-a-Grandparent program and the activities provide opportunities for younger children to visit, sing, read, participate in crafts, and hear stories of times we don’t even think about anymore. These are also opportunities for children to connect in a safe environment and learn respect for adults.

From friendly visits to dog walks, young children can give back without the pressure of “saving the world” so acknowledge these sweet moments as real learning experiences. And remember to be patient; new experiences can take a child out of their comfort zone. Other ways you can help connect your young child/children to giving back are:

Cooking with Kids

Baking or bringing a meal for a friend or family Next time a new baby arrives, a friend is sick, or you know of a friend-in-need ask your child to help pack a welcome meal or package then deliver together.

Walk the dog, take out the trash, water the lawn, the simple gesture to a friend or family member will receive gratitude and it will impact the way a child sees themselves in relation to others.

Teach Kids Environmental Stewardship

When children reach school age, allow them to participate in organizations like Girl and Boy Scouts, which provide necessary training for various activities. These organizations also work closely to ensure the safety of your children while also teaching leadership skills.

Additional opportunities include:

Serving at a Soup Kitchen: Through your church or civic organization, check the minimum age requirement and chaperon the experience. The lesson is powerful; be prepared to discuss mental health to financial matters with your children.

Babysitting at Sunday School: Helping out within a familiar environment builds a sense of pride and community. Your child will also receive feedback from others, which helps reinforce good character and a contributive mindset.

By the time your children reach tween to teen years you might even consider an international trip to help build a library, latrines, or work building new homes for communities-in-need. With the holidays fast approaching take a moment to identify something you can do as a family and get ready to make it a tradition!

December 1, 2014 at 5:00 pm Leave a comment

Thanksgiving Activities For Your Little Ones


The turkey is in the oven, the pumpkin pie is cooling, and little fingers are picking mini marshmallows off the top of the yams. Approximately 280 million turkeys are sold for the Thanksgiving celebrations in the United States. That’s a lot of turkey! Now even though it’s called ‘turkey day’, cooking isn’t the only fun activity your family can do on this day of thanks. Besides eating, Thanksgiving is a great holiday to discuss family traditions, connect with extended family, and show your appreciation and gratitude.

Here are some kid-friendly activities for the whole family as you await the bird in the oven:

1. Leaf Hunt!Fall Chipper with Leaf Bag

Search for some colorful fall leaves outside or print and color some Chipper Fall Leaves or Helping Hands. Then hide them around the house! Make it a treasure hunt by giving clues of thanksgiving related items! Here are a few example hints to get your started:

  • Pumpkin Pie is really great and very yummy. What do I need to help me eat and put it in my tummy? (Answer: The Silverware Drawer)
  • Turkey, Potatoes, Green Beans on my plate. This is where we eat the turkey dinner, it tastes so great! (Answer: The Dining Room Table)
  • Family time and meet and greet! When we relax together, this is our seat! (Answer: The Living Room Couch)

Happy Hunting! You can also create gorgeous cards (or see the craft below!) and name tags for your Turkey dinner using your leaves and mod podge after your game:

IMG_5859

2. Turkey Run!

Chipper Running with Leaves

The mountains of food seems endless on Thanksgiving Day, and so do the cravings for more than one slice of pumpkin pie; but not if your family works up an appetite! ‘Turkey Trots’ are very popular and can help raise funds for a good cause. Take a look at this website and see how you can join a “Turkey Trot” near you! Or take a stroll around the block with the whole family after dinner to help digest the big meal. a simple walk is a great opportunity for some great family conversation!

3. Let’s Learn About Our Family!

Chipper Family Tree

What better time for kids to learn about the family history than on Thanksgiving, when the entire family is gathered together! Print out a Chipper Family Tree and have the kids interact with each family member to see where they belong on the tree. When dinner is finally ready, bring out the completed tree and have each member tell a family story!

4. Thanksgiving Day Placemat!

Print out our complimentary and have your little ones color and fill it out. It’s a great way to keep the kiddos occupied while also teaching them about healthy eating habits and what they are thankful for! Click here or on the image below to download and print (please use legal paper or print on two letter sized paper and tape together).

CFM_Placemat_Thanksgiving

5. Recycle Craft Turkeys!

IMG_1782Create a cute centerpiece for your table or use them as name tags for your Thanksgiving feast seating!

Materials:

  • Recycled Toilet Paper Roll
  • Tape or Glue (we love double stick tape!)
  • Markers or colored pencils
  • Pipe Cleaners or some Fall Leaves
  • Googly Eyes (optional)
  • Recycled paper colored or construction paper and some scissors (optional)
  • Popsicle stick and square of paper if making name tag for table

Directions:

  1. Start with your Turkey face! Draw eyes, a neck waddle, a beak or use googly eyes, cut a triangle from construction paper for the beak and waddle.
  2. Draw on some wings and feathers with markers or colored pencils.
  3. Now add your tail feathers! Find some colorful fall leaves outdoors and glue or tape on to the back of your roll. Or curl some pipe cleaners with your fingers and glue or tape on. Add feet with folded pipe cleaners or cut some out of paper and attach to the bottom of your turkey with glue or tape.
  4. If you are creating a name tag, cut out a small rectangle of white paper, write on your name, then attach to your popsicle stick with glue or tape. Then attach to your turkey, sticking it to the inside back end of your toilet toll with glue or tape.
  5. Add to your table so everyone know where to sit! Or just place in the center or around the house for some fun decorations. You can even use them as napkin holders! Just fold your napkin through the center of the roll.

IMG_1927 IMG_1901

EXTRA CRAFT: If you find some pinecones outside while searching for leaves, add some googly eyes, paper beaks, and feathers with hot glue (with supervision) to create festive table decorations!

IMG_5858

For more fun Thanksgiving activities, visit our Thanksgiving Pinterest Board! Please share your crafts with us in the comments below. Have a Fall-tastic Thanksgiving! Gobble Gobble 🙂

November 12, 2014 at 6:00 pm Leave a comment

Bring the Holidays to Life with Small Potatoes!


Chipper Holiday Spud Party

The Holiday season is upon us and it’s time to start the fun! More often than not, games and activities these days are played on a screen. Kids aged 8 to 18 spend, on average, 44.5 hours per week in front of a screen, according to the Department of Health. Whether they are watching their favorite show or writing… er, typing a school assignment, the amount of time kids (and adults too!) spend looking at a screen is flabbergasting!

Let's Go Chipper | Small Potatoes Magic Toy Maker IMG_1923

Apps and online games can be educating, fun, and beneficial in various ways but we cannot underestimate the importance of real-life experiences and play. Play is a remarkably creative process that fosters emotional health, imagination, original thinking, problem solving, critical thinking, and self-regulation. As children actively invent their own scenarios in play, they work their way through the challenges life presents and gain confidence and a sense of mastery. When they play with materials, children are building a foundation for understanding concepts and skills that form the basis for later academic learning.

Combining the digital and durable worlds is something our Let’s Go Chipper!™ programs have been encouraging for years and now our friends at Magic Toy Maker are bringing in some cute spuds from the App world righto your doorstep. Little Airplane’s Small Potatoes, a popular kid’s show in the UK starring adorable, singing spuds, has come to life in a new app, Small Potatoes Magic Toy Maker. Dress up and personalize your Small Potato with an array of Holiday outfits on the app then get it delivered right to your doorstep for under $20! Shipping is free until November 11th so don’t miss out on the fun! Plus, you can design your very own gift tag with a variety of fun backgrounds and stamps to personalize a present.

There are hundreds if not thousands of new apps to choose from out there but the Small Potatoes Magic Toy Maker is different because it integrates online play with a physical good! Nothing is more magical during the Holiday Season than bringing imagination to life in the form of a soft and cuddly plush toy designed with love. Download it today for free on iTunes or Google Play and join the conversation on the Magic Toy Maker Facebook page! 

November 4, 2014 at 6:15 pm 2 comments

Chipper Snacks: Mummy Madness Monday


Halloween Lil SpatulaMonday Mayhem: You start off strong ready to conquer the week and by the end of the day you wonder if you’ll even make it to Wednesday. Sound familiar? Part of this feeling comes from being conscious of everything you have on your “to do” list rather than the task at hand. So start the week of by listing your “to do’s” on a daily basis then let it go so everything can fall into place and happen. At the top of the list is probably what you need to pick up or make for dinner. As we welcome a week we know will end in screams – rightfully so – let’s kick-off some Halloween fun that will also encourage your kids into the kitchen.
Here are two simple Mighty Mummy dinner ideas to kick off this Monday …and maybe even repeat before you go Trick o’ Treating. “Playing with your food” never tasted so good …er ghoulish.

Mummy Pizza

Mummy Madness Monday 6

Ingredients:Mummy Madness Monday 1

  • ½ cup black olives, sliced
  • 1 package of mozzarella cheese, sliced
  • English muffins
  • ½ cup pizza sauce (click in the link for an easy recipe or buy it pre-made!)

Mummy Madness Monday 3

Directions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Open your English muffin and spread some pizza sauce on it. Let the kids do this – they’ll loved it!
  3. Next, give each mummy two eyes using the black olive slices.
  4. Lastly, use to cut the mozzarella cheese slices into strips. Again, it doesn’t have to be perfect. The kids can lay them over the top of the crust.
  5. Bake 8-10 minutes or until the cheese is melted. Enjoy 🙂

Mummy Madness Monday 5

Mummy Dogs

Mummy Madness Monday 2

Ingredients:

Mummy Madness Monday 7

  • 8 hot dogs
  • 1 can prepared dough of your choice
  • mustard or ketchup, for serving

Mummy Madness Monday 9 Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375˚F
  2. Roll out the dough very thin, then use a pizza cutter to cut skinny strips of dough.
  3. Wrap each hotdog. Leave a little bit of open space around the “face” of the mummy. Keep wrapping in a crisscross pattern until covered. Let the kids do this, it feels sticky & fun. Repeat, then lay them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or baking mat.
  4. Bake 18-20 minutes, until the dough is nice and golden brown.
  5. Use a toothpick to make ‘eyes’ with mustard or ketchup, admire, then enjoy 🙂

Mummy Madness Monday 8

What other Halloween snacks do you and your kids love to make? Share with us in the comments below or on Facebook.

October 27, 2014 at 5:00 pm Leave a comment

Helping your family “Fall Back”


Helping your family Fall Back!” –  Daylight Savings Time ends November 2, 2AMTips for Adjusting to Daylight Savings

An extra yawn one morning in the springtime, an extra snooze one night in the autumn is all that we ask in return for dazzling gifts. We borrow an hour one night in April; we pay it back with golden interest five months later.

                                                                                                – Winston Churchill

Before we had kids, I used to love the end of daylight savings time – a wonderfully lazy Sunday morning gift. In that gloriously anticipated hour, I’d sleep late, or indulge in coffee and reading the Sunday paper front to back (yes, back in the day of the paper actually showing up on your doorstep).

As a parent, next Sunday reminds us that there are no more free hours. Instead, we walk out of work in the dark and wake the kids up when their little bodies are telling them it’s still too early.

Your overtired, off-schedule little ones can be a challenge, but take heart: it usually takes less than two weeks for circadian rhythms to adjust. As the family looks forward to a snuggly autumn and winter, here are some tips for “falling back” more gracefully:IMG_1708

 

  1. Be consistent. Keep meals and activities schedules in place. Keeping your routine with little standard time tweaks will help ease the transition.
  2. Get outside. Sunshine is the reset button. When you can get your kids into the sunshine first thing in the morning, their bodies will adjust more easily. No sunshine? No worries. Just seeing the light of day, and the fresh air, makes the moment the perfect wake-up call. Check out this list of 50 ways to get outdoors in your own backyard for some ideas!
  3. Adjust your schedules. Start bedtime 15 minutes earlier a week as you head into the November 1 weekend.
  4. Nap. Nap. Nap. If you have young children, watch for signs of fatigue and put them down before they miss their sleep window. Crankiness doesn’t help the transition.
  5. Give your early risers what they need. For children over four years old, early rising will be an issue. Give them a stack of new library books and an alarm clock. Agree that they must stay in bed until their “wake-up time,” and allow them to peruse their new books if they’re up early or download some FREE coloring pages here. Blackout curtains can help since it will be much lighter in the morning.
  6. Connect. On Sunday, take advantage of that gloriously anticipated hour to enjoy your family. Take a fall leaf walk in the park before the winter weather sets in. In the evening, enjoy an early dinner, a cuddle on the couch; and an early evening story or movie.
Chipper Family Moments Pamphlet for November

Chipper Family Moments Pamphlet for November! Click here to sign up.

With your child snuggled next to you, reminisce about the good old days where you took that extra hour to sleep in your bed. Free of diaper wipes, stuffed animals, blankies, and shin guards, you could read the whole paper. Today, you’ve got the whole world in your arms.

Chipper Tip:  Remember to check your smoke alarm and flashlight batteries when you set your clock back and add a few more canned items or flats of water to your grocery list – you are winter ready!

October 26, 2014 at 5:30 pm Leave a comment

3 Chipper Tips For Halloween


Why do mummies never reveal their true age? Because they like to keep it under wraps!

Let's Go Chipper | recycle crafts | DIY Halloween Mummy Craft

Make some fun Recycle Halloween Crafts! Click here for instructions.

Halloween is almost here and is a time where both kids and parents get out the cute or scary costumes, the spooky decorations and the delicious candy for a family fun holiday! Enter our Halloween Contest by sharing your costume ideas or past costume pictures to our Facebook wall! Winner will receive our Chipper Family Moments intro box of fun ideas and activities to connect family.

Chipper Family Moments  | Halloween Costume Contest

Click here to enter our Chipper Family Moments Halloween Contest!

Whether you’re Olaf, Elsa or even a scary Vampire this year, Halloween can also be a useful learning experience in both manners as well as safety for your little ghosts and ghouls. Three rules to remember this upcoming Halloween; be safe, be healthy; and don’t forget your manners!

Caution! Witch Crossing.

Chipper and Paisley Flashlight Shadow Animals

Help your children be safe by giving them flashlights, reflectors, or glow sticks to help them see and be seen by drivers when crossing the streets. According to safekids.org, on average, children are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car on Halloween than on any other day of the year, so make sure they’re prepared, understand the importance of staying on the sidewalks, and are aware of their surroundings. A parent or responsible goblin should always accompany the young witches and wizards and should remind them to only visit homes with a porch light on and NEVER enter the home or vehicle of a stranger.

Happy Healthy Haunting!

Chipper Healthy Halloween Snacks and Treats

Click here for Healthy Halloween Snacks and Treats!

Remembering to keep happy and healthy eating habits with all the surrounding candy can be quite a challenging task. Remind your children how important it is to eat a good meal prior to trick-or-treating and to avoid tummy aches by rationing treats for the days after Halloween; all things in moderation. It’s also very important to sort and check each of the prized candy to confirm no tampering was done. An adult should throw away spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious treats. To promote healthy diets for children, some companies will even buy back the candy from your little ones this year; to find a place near you, check out this website >>>> http://www.halloweencandybuyback.com/

I Witch You A Happy Halloween!

halloween-chipper-FB

Halloween is a great opportunity to practice good manners. Remind your little goblins, ghosts and ghouls not to be greedy. One piece of candy from each house is the general Halloween rule and a nice “Thank you!” at each and every house is a must. Even if the candy choice isn’t a favorite of your little ones, a “Thank you!” is still important and shows everyone how polite and well mannered your young Trick-Or-Treaters really are. Another great way to practice good manners is to remember to stay on walkways and avoid stepping on flowerbeds and lawns. Teach your little minions (or monsters?) to treat each home they approach like it’s their own! What other manners do you teach your kids during All Hallows Eve? Share with us in the comments below or on Facebook!

We just couldn’t resist one last treat – Have A Fang-Tastic night!

Knock! Knock!

Who’s There?

Wanda Witch!

Wanda Witch who?

Wanda Witch you a very Happy Halloween!

October 23, 2014 at 6:00 pm Leave a comment

Daily Thanks: Four Ways to Develop the Habit of Gratitude in Your Family


I'm a Chipper Mom“It is not joy that makes us grateful; it is gratitude that makes us joyful.” David Steindl-Rast

Daily expressions of deeply felt gratitude is a common experience among happy, healthy families. Like any other good habit, learning to feel and express gratitude takes practice. Fortunately, even before you’re great at being thankful, practicing gratitude will affect the happiness and success of every family member. To build your gratitude habit, adopt some of the following practices:

1. See the Sunrise – Starting your day with a quiet moment of reflection centers both your body and mind. Before your day gets away from you, imagine the people and things that are gifts in your life. Activating your brain with what’s so great about parenting, you are better prepared to greet the inevitable “ Mommmmmmm, where are my cleats, flash cards, homework I forgot to do?” with appreciation and patience.

2. Express and model gratitude – Albert Einstein once said, “Setting an example is not the main means of influencing another, it is the only means.” This means you. Declare your gratitude as it happens—often and out loud to whomever will hear it. There’s plenty to notice: Healthy kids, secure homes, great teachers, a cup of coffee, the driver who stopped so you could cross the street, and the trash that was taken out before you asked. It’s all a gift. Showing appreciation builds and encourages our friends and family. It also reminds them of the gifts in their own lives.

3. Make creative fun ways to show gratitude in your home – Whether you have toddlers or teens, there are wonderful ways for children to learn to visually express gratitude.

  • Try a family gratitude journal. Each person in the family is asked to share one good thing at dinner which is then added to the journal.
  • Fill a jar or bowl with tags, leaves, or stones.
  • The family fridge or a whiteboard are excellent places to display our joy at the gifts. Place post-its at kid level to note things as they happen.

You will find this exercise will quickly build on itself.

4. Make time to get out together – Walk out that door! Throw caution to the wind! The benefit of 30 minutes–as a family–outdoors far outweighs dirty dishes in the sink or the unmowed lawn. Call out to your gang to put down the electronics, come out of your bedroom, and walk away from the clothes hamper. Instead, walk together to the park. Jump on your bikes and let the kids be the guides. Get an ice cream. Make up a neighborhood scavenger hunt. Talk, share, ask questions, connect.

Being truly present is a gift. When we give quality time to our kids we are showing them love. Be grateful for them. They will be grateful for you. (even if they don’t always say so.)

Gratitude rocks

October 12, 2014 at 10:06 pm 1 comment

School Just Started and I’m Cheating Already


Sometimes it’s okay to cheat.

Continue Reading September 8, 2014 at 7:28 pm Leave a comment

Happy 14th Birthday Geocaching!


geocaching with kidsRemember the year 2000? In the United States, a pound of bacon only cost $3 and a gallon of gas set people back $1.26. The iPhone was still 7 years away from being introduced. But on September 2, 2000, some hearty adventurers, tired of being tied to an office cubicle day after day, launched Geocaching.com. The adventure to inspire outdoor play through GPS technology began.

Just like any story-worthy journey, Geocaching.com’s beginning was filled with uncertainty. Before “geocache” joined the ranks of approved Scrabble words or a Geocaching game piece rocketed to the International Space Station, Geocaching.com launched with only 75 geocaches. Today the site lists the locations and descriptions of nearly 2.5 million geocaches. Adventure is truly waiting to be discovered all around you, as long as you’re in the 180+ countries where geocaches are hidden [hint: you are].

geocaching with kids

Here are some more little known facts about the game you love:

  • The activity of geocaching was originally known as the GPS Stash Hunt.
  • What we now know as the first geocache was hidden on May 3, 2000.
  • The cost of running Geocaching.com was originally funded by the sale of donated tshirts.
  • More than 9 million people have created Geocaching profiles.
  • The word ‘geocache’ means ‘hidden location on Earth’, as ‘geo’ means Earth, and ‘cache’ is French for a hidden location or place.
  • Hugh Jackman goes geocaching (and other celebrities like cyclist Jens Voigt).
  • Share your Geocaching birthday wishes and personal geocaching fun facts (like when you started geocaching) on the Geocaching Facebook page.

geocaching with kids

The mere mention of the word ‘treasure’ is guaranteed to light up kids’ eyes. So, why not take them on a real-life treasure hunt with geocaching? People use global positioning devices and the internet to seek out items hidden by others. “When my guys were 12 and 13 it was fun to do geocaching where you find people’s hidden items via internet clues and GPS. It’s done all over the world [and] it’s fun to hide items too,” says mom of two, Kerri Hopkins. Want to try it? Check out Geocaching.com for help and download their free app!

Let’s Go Chipper into the Great Outdoors and find some Geocaches! When, where or what was your last Geocache? Share your story in the comments below or on Facebook!

September 3, 2014 at 6:00 pm Leave a comment

Cleaning up the Conversation


I'm a Chipper MomThis past Friday I was so excited to come home from work because I knew the house would be clean. I’m not one to have cleaning help but after fostering three dogs and many family-and-friends travelers I raised the white flag and said “Calgon take me away!” The smell and the shine was worth the slip – one turn down the hallway in my socks and I was grabbing the wall to stay up because the floors were waxed (did I pay extra for that?).

Friday night is family night so at dinner I couldn’t help but bring up the conversation on how keeping the house clean and organized really helped me feel empowered to get through each day. A silly topic to kids, and maybe shallow thinking to some, but having an organized and clean house does make me feel like I’ve got everything in order. I do walk out the door feeling like I can get everything done. It’s my thing and I want it to be everyone else’s “thing” as well.

I’ve directed everyone over the years on what I expect them to keep clean in their bedrooms and what I expect everyone to help with around the home. Not one wanting to be the author of many “Chore” charts I’ve posted notes and raised my voice a few times – none of it really created consistency. So before taking the family dinner down the path of “don’t get anything dirty” I decided to ask a few questions.

  1. Where should we hike this weekend?
  2. Who needs what for back-to-school supplies?
  3. What’s for dessert and what’s our movie for tonight?

If you can believe – my youngest exclaimed: “Whatever we do we have to keep the house clean.” What? I couldn’t believe it so I asked, “How are we going to do that?”

Without another prompt my other daughter immediately shared a list she had created when she was little on how she would keep her room clean. It was full of pictures and symbols she said represented everything. With that simple prompt both girls set out to write up a list of items they would focus on to help keep the house clean.Screen Shot 2014-08-25 at 12.09.20 PM

When presented Callie shared that she would include vacuuming because she knew how important a clean floor is when you are cooking. Callie presented her list to us, and wanted to share with other families. Her excitement and deliberation were so evident; her next goal is to laminate the list so she can check and wipe off to start again each week.

The power of conversation goes beyond the boardroom or cocktail party – bringing relevant topics to the family table like individual needs or weekend activity ideas sparks thoughtful conversation and engages kids on a new level. Kids are empathetic and they want to help – when we ask what they can do around the home or for us as parents/caregivers we ignite curiosity; executive function kicks in, leadership skills, and a sense of worth are a part of this as well.Chipper Family Moments | Cleaning Up with Kids

Parenting expert Jim Fay, co-founder of the Love and Logic website, says we all need to feel needed and to know that we’re making a contribution — even kids. “But they can’t feel that way if they don’t have chores and make contributions to the family,” Fay says.

Roger W. McIntire, University of Maryland psychology professor and author of Raising Good Kids in Tough Times, says, “A child has to have some responsibilities.”

According to research, children even younger than 15 months have empathy and realize others and their needs. When we consider physical abilities and emotional readiness we can set personal expectations and engage with our children in a much more positive and constructive way. When we include our children in the conversation about all noted above they feel responsible to the overall wellbeing of the family. A strong sense of emotional responsibility is powerful in the most positive way.

Chipper Family Moments | Cleaning Up with Kids

Try posing a question over telling someone what to do. How does the person respond? Do you find the conversation and actions more positive? Model this approach with your spouse or partner, do you find the results more positive? It’s a simple switch in the way we communicate but the results are impactful and beneficial to everyone.

With a clean house and committed siblings the weekend was so pleasant – I’d like to know what questions will you ask this week?

August 25, 2014 at 2:00 pm Leave a comment

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